Employer Brand Misconceptions: Poor Reputation

Adverto Insights

If your organization has a poor reputation among candidates, is it still worth it to build an employer brand? What if they don’t trust you? Woah let’s reel in that anxiety a little bit–just because you feel you don’t have a great story doesn’t mean it’s not worth telling.

Brooke White, Sr. Employer Brand Specialist Written by Brooke White, Sr. Employer Brand Specialist

Employer Brand Misconceptions: Poor Reputation

AN EMPLOYER BRAND ISN’T GOING TO CHANGE OUR POOR REPUTATION

If your organization has a poor reputation among candidates, is it still worth it to build an employer brand? What if they don’t trust you? Woah let’s reel in that anxiety a little bit–just because you feel you don’t have a great story doesn’t mean it’s not worth telling. 

First and foremost, for an employer brand to be effective, it must be authentic – which is why a lot of organizations are so hesitant to build one in the first place. Authenticity is hard, to be believed and trusted by both candidates and employees your proposition has to resonate with how they experience the brand. 

It’s important to speak truthfully, don’t claim to be something you’ll never be because candidates will see straight through that. Instead, focus on your strengths and find ways to spin perceived negatives into positives that appeal to a specific type of candidate. For example, if your company has a poor work-life balance you could say “our people are 100% dedicated to their work, we work hard because it’s who we are” or if you’re understaffed, promote that you’re looking for people who “like to wear many hats”. It’s a classic case of knowing your customer, or in this case, candidates. 

Along with authenticity, an effective employer brand must also have an aspirational element and tone. This gives employers the platform to say that although we may not be there yet, this is where we’re heading. It provides guidance and vision for the organization, showing candidates what you value as an employer and what you’re driving towards. If you can be transparent about where you are in your journey as an organization, employees and candidates will be more inclined to trust you. 

An employer brand also gives you the opportunity to promote aspects of your organization that candidates may be unfamiliar with. Often times, employers have a lot of great benefits and programs that aren’t acknowledged by candidates or employees, simply because they are poorly communicated. This is your opportunity to talk about the great things you offer your people, but you have to be specific and provide proof points that back your claims. 

If you don’t build and communicate your employer brand, you allow others to tell your story for you. A poor talent reputation is actually the best reason to invest in articulating your employer brand.